Pacemaker Fishing Forum

Welcome Aboard!

You are not logged in.

#1 Oct-31-19 4:25AM

captmikestarrett
Patagonian Toothfish
From: Potomac River
Registered: May-06-08
Posts: 1837
Website

Well ??

I fully expected some talk about last night.. Hmm guess everybody is asleep.

Capt Mike


Light Tackle Fishing Guide on the Potomac

Offline

 

#2 Oct-31-19 7:14AM

Curly
Patagonian Toothfish
Registered: Mar-15-10
Posts: 4966

Re: Well ??

Fell asleep at 2-0.  Woke up to see all the highlights on Sportscenter.


Hell or High Water...........I'm Fishin!!   big_smile

Offline

 

#3 Oct-31-19 7:32AM

Paul Naj
Northern Snakehead
Registered: May-20-08
Posts: 315

Re: Well ??

Grew up in the NYC area so not a Nats fan per se, but was definitely rooting for them this series.

Truly an amazing series and the team never quit. 7 away wins is insane.

Offline

 

#4 Oct-31-19 8:53AM

captmikestarrett
Patagonian Toothfish
From: Potomac River
Registered: May-06-08
Posts: 1837
Website

Re: Well ??

I also fell asleep at the end of the 5th. Did not expect the final score..
Congrats Nats..

Capt Mike


Light Tackle Fishing Guide on the Potomac

Offline

 

#5 Oct-31-19 9:55AM

Ernie
Administrator
From: Ashburn VA
Registered: Feb-03-06
Posts: 13117

Re: Well ??

My story is that I went fishing on Tuesday and Wednesday so I had to go to bed early.  I taped Game 6 and finished watching it (and commentary) around 9:30p during Game 7. I then started watching commentary for Game 7 and then the game and finally caught up to Live baseball around the 8th inning. I stayed up until way past 1a watching the after game stuff (I love the analysis & interviews). Then I finally went to bed and woke up when the banks open, ate breakfast and started to watch all the stuff that I had taped. Still have a couple more hours of baseball talk to watch/listen.

I had turned off my phone and did not look at my computer much during the last 2 days, especially after the game.

Great Fight!

But now, we must wait 103 days for pitchers and catchers to report to start it all over again.

Today, for me, marks the 1st day of a very long (103 days) winter.

This Nats team made a whole lot of folks proud!


Time to go fishin' again!

Offline

 

#6 Oct-31-19 10:00AM

Ernie
Administrator
From: Ashburn VA
Registered: Feb-03-06
Posts: 13117

Re: Well ??

BTW, when I came to the US on Oct. 26, 1960, the original Washington Senators (there was a Washington Nationals before that) left town for Minnesota. Taking with them several very good baseball players. Then we got a new team but they left (to Texas) shortly thereafter. I then became an Orioles fan but Angelos ticked me off (there is a long story there), so I stopped and continued to follow the KC Royals (my cousin Cookie played there). I still love the Royals but was happy when we got the Nats in ‘05. Been following them since.

I think I watched 175+ games this year, most of them were taped and then I would "speed" watch them. I won't do that for any other sport except maybe fishing.


Time to go fishin' again!

Offline

 

#7 Oct-31-19 12:21PM

firemunkee
Patagonian Toothfish
From: Ashburn, VA
Registered: May-23-13
Posts: 1522

Re: Well ??

Yeah I was surprised there wasn't any Nats talk here during the playoffs and especially the world series.

Go Nats!


Together we'll fight the long defeat.

Offline

 

#8 Oct-31-19 12:53PM

T.
Patagonian Toothfish
Registered: Sep-30-09
Posts: 856

Re: Well ??

firemunkee wrote:

Yeah I was surprised there wasn't any Nats talk here during the playoffs and especially the world series.

Go Nats!

Didn't want to jinx them.   I watched all playoff games to the end.  Getting up at 4am after 3.5 hours of sleep isn't fun.

I already had plans to be in DC on Saturday, though I don't know if I'll bother with the parade.

Offline

 

#9 Oct-31-19 1:11PM

Junger
Northern Snakehead
From: Potomac, MD
Registered: Aug-14-17
Posts: 407

Re: Well ??

I watched after I put the kids to bed around 9PM. When they went up 4-2 in the 9th, I broke out the Compass Box Hedonism.

Wish I could relish the victory more, but I'm getting crushed at work with our Q3 financial close. Will be in NJ this weekend too so I'll miss the parade.

Offline

 

#10 Oct-31-19 1:26PM

T.
Patagonian Toothfish
Registered: Sep-30-09
Posts: 856

Re: Well ??

Offline

 

#11 Oct-31-19 1:45PM

Ernie
Administrator
From: Ashburn VA
Registered: Feb-03-06
Posts: 13117

Re: Well ??

I agree with T. So many disappointments in the past. Everyone wrote them off early. I just kept watching and enjoying. It was baseball like I like it. Every player contributed.

Incredible ride, something that I will never forget.


Time to go fishin' again!

Offline

 

#12 Oct-31-19 1:50PM

Ernie
Administrator
From: Ashburn VA
Registered: Feb-03-06
Posts: 13117

Re: Well ??

Oh...the Nats next game (spring training) is on Feb. 22.

They play the Astros.


Time to go fishin' again!

Offline

 

#13 Nov-01-19 6:39AM

firemunkee
Patagonian Toothfish
From: Ashburn, VA
Registered: May-23-13
Posts: 1522

Re: Well ??

Junger wrote:

I watched after I put the kids to bed around 9PM. When they went up 4-2 in the 9th, I broke out the Compass Box Hedonism.

Never had that one. How do you like that? Does MoCo ABS sell it or Total Wine?


Together we'll fight the long defeat.

Offline

 

#14 Nov-01-19 7:25AM

drxfish
Patagonian Toothfish
From: Sterling
Registered: Jan-04-14
Posts: 1513

Re: Well ??

I watched the first 3 games fully.  The 4th game I watched off and on.  My daughter got married the evening of the 5th game, so I missed that.  I was travelling to WV to fish Wednesday and Thursday, so I missed those games, but saw the Nats had won game 6.  Due to no service and travel, I did not see that they won until I got home last evening.  Ups and downs and not one game won at home - unbelievable!


Always wishin' I was fishin'

Offline

 

#15 Nov-01-19 8:24AM

Junger
Northern Snakehead
From: Potomac, MD
Registered: Aug-14-17
Posts: 407

Re: Well ??

firemunkee wrote:

Junger wrote:

I watched after I put the kids to bed around 9PM. When they went up 4-2 in the 9th, I broke out the Compass Box Hedonism.

Never had that one. How do you like that? Does MoCo ABS sell it or Total Wine?

MoCo ABS had it on sale...MSRP was $144, reduced to $105. It was good, but I wouldn't get it again even for the reduced price, there are better values at that price range. The one Compass Box I really enjoyed was their limited release No Name. Their Spice Tree at $70 is OK, it's similar to Oban 14 IMO, but I'd rather just get a bottle of Lagavulin 16 in that price range.

Offline

 

#16 Nov-01-19 10:28AM

backtofuturetoyota
Northern Snakehead
From: Stafford
Registered: Jan-12-12
Posts: 407

Re: Well ??

I'm a baseball fan and like Houston, but I was hoping for nats.....mostly because zimm is like ovie....theyre great players and deserved it.  best matchup Ive seen in years!!  Respect for the nats players!

Offline

 

#17 Nov-01-19 5:37PM

Ernie
Administrator
From: Ashburn VA
Registered: Feb-03-06
Posts: 13117

Re: Well ??

By Frederic J. Frommer

The weird similarities between the beginning and end of D.C.’s baseball woes: The 1924 Senators and the 2019 Nationals both triumphed after comeback victories — and both featured 36-year-old heroes.

The Washington Nationals’ dramatic World Series victory has extinguished nearly a century’s worth of D.C. baseball heartache ­— including two gut-wrenching Fall Classic losses, five decades of awful baseball, losing two franchises and having no team for 33 years, and then crashing out of the playoffs in agonizing fashion more recently.

From those depths, these Nationals have taken us on a roller coaster of emotions that, many times this year, felt like (gulp) a repeat was in the offing. But that made their win over the heavily favored Houston Astros all the sweeter.

“First in war, first in peace, and last in the American League” was an often-accurate description of baseball in the District. The old Washington Senators (also known as the Nationals) started out with 11 straight losing seasons at the beginning of the 20th century. In 1904, they were historically bad, losing or tying their first 13 games and finishing with a .252 winning percentage.

Things improved when Clark Griffith took over as manager in 1912 — a move his friends tried to talk him out of — and purchased a 10 percent share of the team. He eventually amassed a controlling interest and replaced himself as manager, and his shrewd baseball moves led to Washington’s first pennant and World Series title, in 1924.

Until Wednesday, that was the high-water mark in Washington baseball history.

The Nationals are making D.C. a baseball city again

In 1925, after repeating as American League champs, Washington took on the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series. The favored Senators jumped out to a three-games-to-one lead, but the Pirates won the next two games to force a decisive Game 7 in Forbes Field.

After rain forced a postponement, Walter Johnson, the hero of the 1924 championship, took the mound on a wet, muddy field. “The Big Train” had won his first two series starts, but he strained his leg in the second one and was not himself in the series finale. The Pirates pounded him for 15 hits and nine runs and erased a 4-0 lead to win the game 9-7.

The Senators fielded good teams in the next several years, but they were blocked from the World Series by the Murderers’ Row Yankees and the dynastic Philadelphia Athletics. Washington finally won another pennant in 1933, posting a .651 winning percentage, still the best in D.C. baseball history, and took on the underdog New York Giants in what would be the last World Series here until this fall.

After dropping the first two games in New York, the Senators won Game 3 in Washington, with President Franklin D. Roosevelt throwing out the first pitch, and they had the chance to take control of the series with the next two games at home, too.

But the Senators couldn’t capitalize on their home field (sound familiar?), dropping both games in extra innings. The Game 3 victory in 1933 remains the last time a Washington team won a World Series game at home.

The finale was particularly hard to stomach: In the top of the 10th, Mel Ott hit a ball to center field that Senators outfielder Fred Schulte deflected into the stands for a home run. Initially, Ott stood at second base, but the umpires ultimately awarded him a homer.

A year later, the cash-strapped Griffith sold off his popular star player-manager Joe Cronin, a future Hall of Famer, to the Boston Red Sox for $250,000 and a marginal player. (Cronin, a shortstop, had recently married Griffith’s niece.)

That move pretty much signaled the end of competitive baseball in Washington in the 20th century. The Senators mounted just one pennant race — in 1945, with a team of misfits in the final year of World War II, including a half-deaf outfielder — but they were eliminated on the final day of the season.

The Senators, playing poorly and drawing few fans, moved to Minnesota for the 1961 season and almost immediately improved, winning the American League pennant there in 1965. Meanwhile, a new expansion Washington Senators team was as bad as the old one, posting just one winning season in 11 years, before they, too, abandoned the city to become the Texas Rangers. That move ended an unbelievably bad run of baseball in Washington: From 1946 to 1971, covering the two franchises, Washington managed just two winning seasons.

Still, most fans would agree it’s better to have a bad team than none at all, and an entire generation missed out. Major League Baseball seemed to view Washington as a two-time loser and was reluctant to try again, staying away for 33 long years until it moved the Montreal Expos moved here for the 2005 season.

But the newborn Nationals, after a surprisingly competitive first season, seemed to pick up where the old teams left off: They lost 100-plus games in 2008 and 2009, finishing with the worst record in the majors both years. Even when the team turned things around early in this decade, it ended badly, with several excruciating losses in the National League Division Series.

The curse of Teddy is real. Here’s how Nats fans can lift it.

That’s why it was such a breakthrough when the Nats beat the heavily favored Los Angeles Dodgers in the NLDS this year. The club still hadn’t proved anything, but the talk of being a postseason choker evaporated.

And they seemed to have captured the magic of the ’24 Washington Senators, until now the only D.C. team to win the World Series. There are some striking similarities between the two ballclubs — from their struggles early in the season to their unlikely championships.

By now, most fans have memorized the numbers 19-31 — the Nats’ record over the first third of the season, when their chances of winning the World Series were calculated at a pitiful 1.5 percent. The Senators were a bit better in 1924, starting off 24-26. Neither team was expected to contend after such slow starts.

But “Washington got hot quicker than almost any club I ever saw,” Babe Ruth would later write in his autobiography. If he had been around to see the 2019 Nats, he might put them in the same category.

Both teams finished the regular season with 14-6 records over their final 20 games. The Nats had a longer path to the World Series: They needed to win the wild-card game, the NLDS and the National League Championship Series to get there, while the Senators went straight to the Fall Classic by having the best record in the American League in an era before divisional play.

Both Washington teams were heavy underdogs to World Series rivals that had led their respective leagues in batting average, on-base percentage and slugging percentage and had won the World Series two years earlier. And both fell behind three games to two, forcing them to win the final two games of the series. They even both trailed by two runs late in the seventh game — the seventh inning for the 2019 Nats, the eighth inning for the 1924 Senators.

Thanks to the whizzes at baseball-reference.com, we can reconstruct games to see a team’s expected chance of winning at specific points. When Adam Eaton grounded out leading off the top of the seventh on Wednesday night with the Nats trailing 2-0, just before Anthony Rendon’s home run, their win probability was a skimpy 16 percent.

Ninety-five years ago, at old Griffith Stadium, the Senators’ Ossie Bluege fouled out to begin the bottom of the eighth with the Giants leading 3-1, dropping Washington’s win probability to an even slimmer 13 percent. Then the Senators rallied for two runs to tie the score, before winning the game in extra innings.

Here’s another fact that binds the two Washington ballclubs: Only five teams in World Series history have ever overcome a multirun deficit in the seventh inning or later of Game 7. The Senators were the first to do it. The Nats are the last. (Alas, the second was the Pirates in the ’25 World Series against the Senators.)

There’s more — of course — because this is baseball. Both teams had 36-year-old heroes: Howie Kendrick, who hit the go-ahead homer in the seventh inning, and Walter Johnson, who came in from the bullpen in the ninth inning after the Senators tied the score. He would pitch four innings in relief to win the game after losing his two World Series starts. Johnson had been pounded in his previous start — something he had in common with Nats pitcher Patrick Corbin, who like Johnson found vindication with several scoreless innings of relief to win Game 7.

By taking their fans to the brink of elimination five times this postseason, including twice in the World Series, the Nationals have made the exorcism of all the bad baseball karma complete. The Red Sox vanquished their burden of historical failure in 2004, and the Chicago Cubs neutralized theirs in 2016. Now it’s finally Washington’s turn.


Time to go fishin' again!

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson